Jump to content


Photo

Fishing Kayak


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 flyers1kak

flyers1kak

    PAC Regular

  • Registered Guest
  • PipPip
  • 403 posts

Posted 29 January 2012 - 12:07 AM

Hey guys,

its been a long time. I graduated penn state and found a job and am lookin to treat myself for all the hard work after my first paycheck. really interested in a fishing kayak. i know barely anything about the topic. i figure a livewell is pretty important. storage. is size a huge thing? The boat down the shore is such a hassle to plan a trip and get other people to go with me that a kayak would be awesome for solo spur of the moment trips to get away from it all. will be mostly using it down in avalon, nj, although i might try to slip it in "you know where" sometime at night :D .. i'm looking on the hobie site right now, but i know a couple of you guys have done kayaking and wondered if you guys had any insight. Thanks! Hope everyone had a great summer and fall of fishin and i'm lookin forward to the spring as i'm sure you all are!

#2 The Don

The Don

    FISH HARD

  • Charter Member
  • 2,560 posts
  • LocationPhila,pa

Posted 29 January 2012 - 12:34 AM

Congrats,Good luck,Hope you get the one you want.
Throw your lure in the water and put the puzzle together..

#3 Tom

Tom

    PAC Junkie

  • Charter Member
  • 2,950 posts

Posted 29 January 2012 - 09:31 AM

Hey Flyers, good to see you back. Congrats on graduating and welcome to the real world. I still miss my college days, even though they are wayyy behind me now.

I had wanted a yak for a long time too and bought one from Jesse (on this site) two years ago. It was a 12' sit on top Manta Ray with an anchoring trolley system, multiple rod holders and had front and back dry storage. It was sweeet and I went apeshit tricking it out with a fish finder, lights and eveything I could imagine. I used it a few times at Marsh Creek and loved it, except when it got really windy - then it became work. I found I was spending a lot more time manueviring the yak then fishing. Don't get me wrong, I think it is a superior approach to fishing and I would argue that it is better than a traditional boat, but it is more work than I first suspected. Loading it on the car, launching it, setting it up, paddling to the spots I want to fish, coming back, unloading the fishing stuff, loading it back on my car, unloading it at home and stowing away everything reminded me of why I got rid of my boat several years ago. It was cool when I was actually fishing, but the effort involved in preparing it, getting it on the water, and the opposite when I was done, started to make fishing less like fishing and more like work...to me at least.

Now, if you have a place near or on the water where you don't have to deal with all of that, you are set. FIshing from a yak was a blast once I did it. I loved the stealth approach. I would still have mine if I didn't completely destroy my left shoulder trying to load the 70 lb yak off and on my suv. I feel it every day of my life and probably will need to get it fixed at some point. I still have some nice scratches on my car from the rudder. Loading a heavier yak off and on a higher vehicle by yourself sucks.

I liked yak fishing, I think it gives you a real edge. I personally just prefer the simplicity behind just wading after fish.

If you get a yak, I definitely would suggest a sit on top. If you are using it in the salt, I would not go less than 12 feet. Hobies, with the foot drive, are the cream of the crop. If funds allow, that would be idea. You are approaching the area of a small used outboard boat in pricing though, so just be aware. Everyone will have their favorite brands. Tarpon 120s are well spoken of out there in yak land too. As important as the yak itself may be, the paddle you will be using is at least as important, if not more so. DO NOT CHEAP OUT ON A CUT RATE PADDLE! Pay the $ for good lightweight ones, you will be much better off. Check out Cabelas for their selection. Think over $100 for a good paddle. Go with the teardrop blade design. A reputable dealer will allow you to test drive a yak.

#4 flyers1kak

flyers1kak

    PAC Regular

  • Registered Guest
  • PipPip
  • 403 posts

Posted 29 January 2012 - 03:24 PM

Hey Flyers, good to see you back. Congrats on graduating and welcome to the real world. I still miss my college days, even though they are wayyy behind me now.

I had wanted a yak for a long time too and bought one from Jesse (on this site) two years ago. It was a 12' sit on top Manta Ray with an anchoring trolley system, multiple rod holders and had front and back dry storage. It was sweeet and I went apeshit tricking it out with a fish finder, lights and eveything I could imagine. I used it a few times at Marsh Creek and loved it, except when it got really windy - then it became work. I found I was spending a lot more time manueviring the yak then fishing. Don't get me wrong, I think it is a superior approach to fishing and I would argue that it is better than a traditional boat, but it is more work than I first suspected. Loading it on the car, launching it, setting it up, paddling to the spots I want to fish, coming back, unloading the fishing stuff, loading it back on my car, unloading it at home and stowing away everything reminded me of why I got rid of my boat several years ago. It was cool when I was actually fishing, but the effort involved in preparing it, getting it on the water, and the opposite when I was done, started to make fishing less like fishing and more like work...to me at least.

Now, if you have a place near or on the water where you don't have to deal with all of that, you are set. FIshing from a yak was a blast once I did it. I loved the stealth approach. I would still have mine if I didn't completely destroy my left shoulder trying to load the 70 lb yak off and on my suv. I feel it every day of my life and probably will need to get it fixed at some point. I still have some nice scratches on my car from the rudder. Loading a heavier yak off and on a higher vehicle by yourself sucks.

I liked yak fishing, I think it gives you a real edge. I personally just prefer the simplicity behind just wading after fish.

If you get a yak, I definitely would suggest a sit on top. If you are using it in the salt, I would not go less than 12 feet. Hobies, with the foot drive, are the cream of the crop. If funds allow, that would be idea. You are approaching the area of a small used outboard boat in pricing though, so just be aware. Everyone will have their favorite brands. Tarpon 120s are well spoken of out there in yak land too. As important as the yak itself may be, the paddle you will be using is at least as important, if not more so. DO NOT CHEAP OUT ON A CUT RATE PADDLE! Pay the $ for good lightweight ones, you will be much better off. Check out Cabelas for their selection. Think over $100 for a good paddle. Go with the teardrop blade design. A reputable dealer will allow you to test drive a yak.



awesome thanks tom!

#5 ILoveFishing

ILoveFishing

    PAC Regular

  • Club Member
  • 912 posts

Posted 29 January 2012 - 09:12 PM

I have a sit in model, and fishing out of it is not bad for me at all, i just feel a little safer in a sit in kayak, and i can put removable rod holders along the rim depending on what i am fishing for, sit on top is probably your best bet thou. Even after spending 300 for my yak, i did not regret it one bit, i installed 2 internal rod holders on each side behind my seat, a 15lb anchor with 50 feet of rope that i can easily clip on and off of the handle on the back of my yak, and purchased a hummingbird 170 fish finder that i still have figure out how i am going install. I also plan on getting a clip on the side to hold my paddle on while i am fishing to make more room in the hull, i just keep all of my tackle in a bag up in between my feet, and tools like pliers, and a knife on the little compartment holders on the front lip of my hull. Goodluck on finding one that fits you.
Itching for some fishing.

#6 Tom

Tom

    PAC Junkie

  • Charter Member
  • 2,950 posts

Posted 29 January 2012 - 09:20 PM

I do think SOT vs Sit In yaks are more a matter of preference. I definitely agree that a good knife is a MUST have at all times if you anchor up. You don't want to have an anchor stuck on some debris when the tide starts ripping or the wind/storm comes rolling in.

#7 ILoveFishing

ILoveFishing

    PAC Regular

  • Club Member
  • 912 posts

Posted 30 January 2012 - 09:45 AM

Yeah that is why i like how i can just un clip it in a situation like thay, or if it gets stuck. Anywhere you can call if your anchor gets snagged? The anchor itself is not a problem but i would hate to just leave the 50 feet of rope in the water, probably a farfetched question. Anyway, at least take the kayak you like down on the floor and sitin it and move around before you buy it, taking it for a spin and returning it would be better if the place you get it lets you.
Itching for some fishing.

#8 GC

GC

    PAC Junkie

  • Charter Member
  • 2,189 posts

Posted 30 January 2012 - 01:42 PM

I do think SOT vs Sit In yaks are more a matter of preference. I definitely agree that a good knife is a MUST have at all times if you anchor up. You don't want to have an anchor stuck on some debris when the tide starts ripping or the wind/storm comes rolling in.


GREAT ADVICE!!! Had that happen to me while onboard a rental Garvey in Delaware Bay in May. Scary experience... Squall came up, tide was pushing and we couldn't get the anchor dislodged. Boat was taking on water and we were bailing... man is the water cold in May. Should have had a good knife onboard.

#9 flyers1kak

flyers1kak

    PAC Regular

  • Registered Guest
  • PipPip
  • 403 posts

Posted 14 February 2012 - 11:52 PM

So i found out today I am going to be let go once the merger is finalized. my whole department is getting canned. super. so long kayak, hello more job interviews <_<

#10 CO

CO

    PAC Regular

  • Club Member
  • 399 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 07:58 AM

So i found out today I am going to be let go once the merger is finalized. my whole department is getting canned. super. so long kayak, hello more job interviews <_<



Don't let it get you down, I feel for people right out of school, all the debt and no jobs. I came out 2001 with a BS in Biochem & Molecular Biology from PSU and landed a very stable job and that job paid for an MBA at SJU at night. I was able to buy my first house, get a free 45K graduate degree and not need to worry about anything, since the ecnomy tanked I have been let go once and just finishing up yet another buyout, this one my group was saved. The worst is nothing is performance based, they just ax the entire department. It sucks but keep your head up, I was let go from a job with a 50 minute commute and now work 20 minutes from my house and got a 12% raise when I signed on almost two years ago. Getting let go is not the end of the world but more and more people need to deal with it now then 10 years ago.

#11 ILoveFishing

ILoveFishing

    PAC Regular

  • Club Member
  • 912 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 09:20 AM

I would still get one ;)
Itching for some fishing.

#12 The Don

The Don

    FISH HARD

  • Charter Member
  • 2,560 posts
  • LocationPhila,pa

Posted 15 February 2012 - 10:14 AM

That sucks,Hang in there!!
Throw your lure in the water and put the puzzle together..

#13 Doc Watson

Doc Watson

    PAC Junkie

  • Charter Member
  • 2,134 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 02:54 PM

So i found out today I am going to be let go once the merger is finalized. my whole department is getting canned. super. so long kayak, hello more job interviews <_<

Sucks about the job flyers. <_< But, like CO said, it's the way of the working world today. You don't have a career with one company anymore. You have a series of jobs throughout your working life. Look at this as a chance to polish your interview and job hunting skills. :unsure: ;)

Keep a good attitude, put the kayak on the back burner (still 3 months before the water warms enough to make yakin' safe)and be glad you can still live at home. Rent's a bitch without a job !!! :blink:

#14 matt

matt

    knot conquistador

  • Admin
  • 1,949 posts
  • LocationUp the street from the knot!

Posted 15 February 2012 - 02:58 PM

Good luck buddy! You'll do fine. There are a lot of yaks on craigslist, nice ones too. I would consider going that route.

#15 ILoveFishing

ILoveFishing

    PAC Regular

  • Club Member
  • 912 posts

Posted 15 February 2012 - 02:59 PM

They have some really really good deals at Dicks Franklin Mills on decent kayaks, sit in and sit on top. The one is $150, it is a sit on top, wide and lots of room, and it comes with a paddle and a life vest no extra charge, check it out if you get a chance, you can always re-sell them as they sell really fast on craigslist, hell you might be able to resell it for more to an excited and gullible first time buyer.
Itching for some fishing.

#16 flyers1kak

flyers1kak

    PAC Regular

  • Registered Guest
  • PipPip
  • 403 posts

Posted 20 February 2012 - 11:45 PM

thanks guys. I'm going to wait until the summer and see where I am (employed/unemployed) before I think about buying anything, or maybe I can convince my dad to sell our boat and get a nice carolina skiff that can sneak around the backbays ;)

#17 misterpond

misterpond

    PAC Lurker

  • Registered Guest
  • Pip
  • 9 posts

Posted 09 March 2012 - 08:12 AM

My yaks are sit inside. They are great for freshwater and fishing in March. It gets cold out there and bringing the stripers in is a little easier and I don't get wet in the cold months. I may look into getting a sit on top for warm months and the ocean. I have not yet taken my yak in the ocean but would love to sit over the fourth wave and pick up big fish. Right now I limit myself to freshwater fish like bass, pickerel, etc and hit the stripers coming up the Delaware and schuylkill rivers in the spring. First outing in 2 weeks.

There is a lot of good advice above. It depends on where you will live and do most of your fishing. Enjoy, you will catch tons of big fish on a kayak and your arms will get tired from reeling them in. ONe word of advice, use a shorter rod to ease the work on your shoulder.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users